This Sept. 7, 2019 photo provided by Tracee Herbaugh shows some of the china for sale at a flea market in Brimfield, Mass. China has become a staple at flea markets, as younger people opt to sell or donate heirloom dishware.

This Sept. 7, 2019 photo provided by Tracee Herbaugh shows a Royal Worcester plate for sale at the Brimfield, Mass., flea market. Royal Worcester was started 1751 and is believed to be the oldest or second oldest English porcelain brand still in existence today.

This Sept. 7, 2019 photo provided by Tracee Herbaugh shows shows a variety of china for sale at the Brimfield Flea Market in Brimfield, Mass.

Every nook and cranny was filled with something — papers, mugs, old photographs, knickknacks, furniture. There were also two complete sets of Johann Haviland china, from plates and platters to an ornate coffee pot.

The reasons not to keep Grandma’s china were many. My family is casual, not traditional. We live in a small home outside Boston and have moved four times in the last decade. Most importantly, I’m kind of a minimalist. I just don’t like having a lot of unnecessary things.



“Multiple generations of china in one house (or, more specifically, basement) seems to be a common American condition,” said Adam Minter, who wrote the new “Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale” (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019).

The book follows what happens to possessions once they’re donated. Minter was inspired to write it after dropping off his mother’s china at Goodwill. It was the last of his mother’s possessions that he and his sister dealt with.

“We put it off, mostly because we know my mother loved it,” Minter said. “But neither of us actually wanted it.”

The five enormous boxes I filled with Grandma’s blue garland china, which she purchased in the 1980s from the grocery store where she worked, sat unopened in my basement months after they arrived.

Acquiring a set of china isn’t the rite of passage it was decades ago. Some people still collect it, but nowadays it might not even end up on a couple’s wedding registry.

“More and more younger people don’t see the need to use their space for things that are ceremonial,” said Cecilia Jones, a personal organizer and productivity coach in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Neda Ghaffari , a 37-year-old San Francisco doctor who married last summer, opted to register for modern dinnerware she could use daily or for entertaining. China feels outdated, Ghaffari said, and difficult to maintain, as it normally has to be hand-washed.

“We didn’t register for china because we live in a relatively small condo in San Francisco and generally only entertain small groups at a time,” she said. “We also have limited storage space in our kitchen.”

Moving more frequently and living in tight quarters means people are less likely to accumulate things.

Deidre Bryant, a 32-year-old teacher from Aurora, Colorado, registered for off-white plates from Crate and Barrel ahead of her 2017 wedding. As for china, “the thought didn’t even cross my mind,” she said.

“I have three young boys, and the thought of having a bunch of super delicate china in my home just sounds stressful, and like more unneeded clutter,” she said.

Brook said that if she inherited a loved one’s china, she would probably keep a piece or two to hold on to history and memories.

Many people are donating china sets or selling them online. China is a mainstay at garage sales, secondhand stores or flea markets.

“Two very affluent generations, the ‘Greatest Generation’ and the Boomers, that acquired stuff at historically high rates are now downsizing and dying,” Minter said. “So that’s creating a surplus of all kinds of secondhand stuff, heirlooms and otherwise.”

In the last few years, Beverly Solomon has been scooping up antique china sets for her Dallas-based business, Beverly Solomon Design, which provides interior design services to restaurants and other businesses.

“I’ll find boxes of beautiful sets for next to nothing,” Solomon said. “It’s quite amazing.”

The two organizers with whom I spoke said that what I did with Grandma’s china would depend on my priorities and values. For instance, is it important to me to keep the sets together? It’s not. Do I want to save a set for each of my children? I don’t.

“If it sits in the basement and gathers dust, it isn’t honoring your grandmother,” Jones said. “The question becomes how to keep it alive.”

“If I’m saving something, I’ll keep it in the condition it deserves,” Rosenthal said. She noted there are specialized storage containers to hold china and protect it from things like mold or corrosion.

But I was not about to invest in a new china storage system. For me, it is a priority not to be encumbered by possessions I don’t need or use.

“In letting it go and knowing you don’t have control of it, you are releasing it to the universe,” Jones said. “It served its purpose, it had its moment and meaning.”

With that bit of wisdom, I pulled out 12 dinner plates, a platter and a few bowls. We used them for our Thanksgiving dinner. The rest of the china is boxed and headed to Goodwill, where I hope another family can love it like we did.

PLAINS TWP. — The fact that it was Valentine’s Day did not escape Ron Beer during his opening remarks in announcing an $80 million expansion of the Frank M. and Dorothea Henry Cancer Center at Geisinger Wyoming Valley.

As part of Geisinger’s commitment to preventive care, the chief administrative officer of Geisinger Northeast said, for those who may have forgotten what day it is, “We have a gift shop that’s open.”

Beer joined Geisinger President and CEO Dr. Jaewon Ryu and cancer institute chair Dr. Rajiv Panikkar in announcing the major investment in the cancer center, which will be expanded from about 30,000 square feet to nearly 130,000 square feet. The change will include a new lobby entrance, an 18-bed inpatient unit to serve bone marrow transplant patients or those with complicated blood cancers, and flexible room designs allowing each unit to be adapted to a patient’s specific needs.

Beer said the changes should could include a juice bar in the lobby “It will be more like a living room than a waiting room.” and Geisinger is looking to partner with other cancer patient support organizations like Candy’s Place to add some retail space because “patients going through cancer treatment have unique needs.

Beer and Panikkar rattled off a string of investments Geisinger has made in Luzerne County, and Beer noted that once this expansion is complete the medical giant will have spent about $300 million in the area since 2008. “Every investment is designed to do one thing,” he said, “make health easier.

Panikkar said the company hasn’t been waiting for the expansion to start doing that, with investments in other state-of-the-art tech and treatment options already underway, including a new CyberKnife that will deliver “highly targeted radiation treatment.

“When people are faced with the troubles related to cancer, we want them to understand we have teams that have dedicated their lives to providing the est care” in all aspects of treatment, he said. And Geisinger is working to constantly improve, he added. The expansion should also mean a bigger research program. “We hope to expand our access to clinical trials for our patients.”

Beer made it a point to praise the Henry family for their contributions to the center, noting Frank and Dorothy’s daughter Marjorie Marquart was in the room, as was their grandson John Henry. After the meeting the two chatted with Beer and admired the renderings of the expanded facility, presented on projection screens, large posters and a small three-dimensional model.

Frank and Dorothy Henry donated money for the construction of the cancer center , which opened in 1992. Looking at the picture, Marquart smiled. “The first building fulfilled my parents’ original dream,” she said. “This is expanding that dream.”

HUNLOCK TWP. — A Plains Township man died as a result of being struck by a vehicle on state Route 11 Thursday night.

State police at Shickshinny said they responded to investigate a vehicle verses pedestrian at about 7:45 p.m.

A 71-year-old man from Shickshinny was also involved in the crash but state police did not specify if he was the driver of the vehicle.

Assisting at the scene were the state police Forensic Services Unit, Hunlock Creek Fire/EMS, Lake Silkworth EMS, emergency medical technicians from Geisinger Medical Center in Berwick. The vehicle was towed by Ken Pollock Autobody.

Hacken stated McElwee was transported to Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center in Plains Township where he died.

The cause of death was determined to be multiple traumatic injuries and the manner of death an accident.

WILKES-BARRE — City police said Motorworld Auto Group filed a report that four Jeep Wranglers were stolen from their lot.

PLAINS TWP. — A taste of Philadelphia has set up shop in the Mohegan Sun Pocono casino, and it replaced a ribbon-cutting with a cutting of a giant cheesesteak.

Tony Luke’s, a chain of cheesesteak restaurants that claims to be “the real taste of South Philly,” officially opened its newest location in the casino’s food court. The location marks the first Tony Luke’s in our area, and one of only a handful based outside of southeastern Pennsylvania.

The company’s owner, Tony Luke Jr., was on hand to mark the occasion, slicing into a cheesesteak that was easily 5 feet long to symbolize the shop’s official opening. Luke praised the casino, saying that partnering with them has gone remarkably well.

“It’s a scary thing to put your name on something and to kind of give it to someone else to take care of; it’s kind of like your baby,” he said, before adding that those fears were assuaged when he saw the casino’s kitchen staff. “I was completely blown away by the standards by which they adhere to.”

Mohegan Sun Pocono’s head chef, Franco Torquato, had similar praise for the Tony Luke’s brand’s standards.

“When you hear their ideology and their story and their passion behind all this, it’s exciting to be a part of,” Torquato said.

According to the Tony Luke’s website, that ideology involves the company working directly with Midwestern cattle farmers and Southern New Jersey produce farms to ensure high-quality ingredients, along with bread baked with a secret recipe.

Accompanying the opening of the restaurant was a Philadelphia-themed mural, painted by Pittston-based artist Aryanna Davis. Featuring some Philadelphia icons — City Hall and its statue of William Penn, the LOVE sculpture and a statue of Rocky Balboa — Davis’ mural uses negative space between sections to mimic the columns of a railway bridge.

“I wanted to preserve the brick, because I thought the brick was really beautiful,” she said, explaining her use of negative space, showing off the wall’s brick between sections.

Davis’ paintings were done on canvas in her personal studio, which were then attached to the wall during a three-day process. Next week, another mural from her, featuring classic images from New York City, will also be added to the walls at the casino to go along with the New York-style pizza restaurant, Slice’d.

WILKES-BARRE — City Council on Thursday night approved Mayor George Brown’s $51.9 million balanced budget for this year.

The 4-0 vote in favor of the budget ordinance on its second and final reading came nearly a month and a half into Brown’s term. Council has five elected members, but council vice chairman Tony Brooks was excused from the regularly scheduled meeting and Brown also was unable to attend due to an illness.

Brown submitted an amended version of the spending plan his predecessor Tony George presented last year. However, council did not bring George’s $52.6 million balanced budget to a vote and gave Brown the opportunity to present his own numbers. Neither of the plans included a property tax increase.

Council also passed two ordinances that increased fees for building permits and pave cuts and provided revenue to balance the budget.

The lone resolution, requiring one reading for approval, was approved by council. But the temporary suspension of the city’s prohibition on the open consumption of alcoholic beverages to allow beer and possibly wine to be sold at the upcoming Rockin’ the River concert series met with some opposition from the public.

For the second year in a row the series will be held at the River Commons. The concerts will run from 5 to 9 p.m. on July 10, 17, 24 and 31. A fourth date was added this year.

City resident Sam Troy maintained his stance against the sale of alcoholic beverages at an event attended by families and children.

“I spoke out against this last summer and I’m speaking out against it now. The suspension of the ordinance I don’t think should be permitted,” Troy said.

Troy asked for an answer from Ted Wampole, the executive director of the Luzerne County Convention & Visitors Bureau that requested the suspension, on whether the county receives “an extra commission” for the alcohol sales.

Jason Carr of Saylorsburg, a property owner in Wilkes-Barre, joined Troy in asking that council vote against the suspension.

“I guess the only question that I have regarding that is, if there is not alcohol at the events will that stop the public from coming or will that deter anyone from coming if there was not alcohol served,” Carr asked.

Wampole repeated his statement from Tuesday night’s work session that there were no alcohol-related incidents last year.

“There were plenty of people there that weren’t drinking and had a good time and had no problem with anybody that was there having a couple of drinks,” Wampole said.

The series is scheduled for that time period to keep the potential for problems to a minimum and the county Sheriff’s Department provides ample security, Wampole said.

Councilwoman Beth Gilbert McBride suggested looking into limiting the number of drinks sold to an individual.

Prior to votes, Bill Harris, the city Zoning Officer and Director of Planning & Zoning, briefed council on the flood mitigation program and said its Class 6 rating, the highest in the state for seven years, reduces flood insurance premiums for property owners.

Applications are now available for Luzerne County voters interested in casting their April 28 primary election ballots by mail.

In the past, voters had to cite a reason they were unable to appear at the polls on Election Day — such as an illness, travel, work or other obligation — to take advantage of absentee voting.

Voters should consider the new option for convenience or to avoid polling place crowds in the high-turnout presidential election, when the county will be using a new paper-trail system for the first time, said county Election Director Shelby Watchilla.

“We are encouraging the no-excuse, mail-in ballot,” Watchilla said. “There will be lines at polling places, and we can’t control that.”

With the new election equipment, voters will make selections on computerized ballot-marking devices similar to the way they do now. But instead of touching a screen box to cast the ballot, voters will receive a paper printout to verify their selections before the paper is fed into a tabulator to be read and saved in compliance with a state mandate.

While stressing the new system is “very simple to use,” Watchilla said the extra step of feeding paper into a tabulator will take more time.

Registered voters interested in the new mail-in option must apply for a ballot. Applications must be received at the county election office by 5 p.m. on the Tuesday before the election, or April 21 for the upcoming primary.

Applications are available on the elections section at www.luzernecounty.org or at the county election office on the second floor of the Penn Place Building, which is Pennsylvania Avenue and Market Street in downtown Wilkes-Barre.

The election office is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., but Watchilla said office employees will work later April 21 to ensure applications are accepted from all last-minute prospective mail-in voters in the office before 5 p.m. that day.

Applicants will start receiving their mail-in ballots when the ballots are printed on or after March 9. A specific date for ballot completion has not been set.

Once ballots are ready in March, those applying at the election office can avoid the mail-in altogether under another state reform. These in-person visitors can both submit their applications for processing and cast their ballot in the same visit. The office has a secure, locked box for the completed ballots, Watchilla said.

Due to an expected surge in mail-in ballots, the county may not have election night tallying of votes that are not cast in polling places, Watchilla said. Correct counting must take precedence over speedy releasing of results, she said.

“In every county, the results are going to take longer to count,” she said. “We’d rather take our time and have it all done accurately.”

The election office has received and tested its 750 ballot marking devices in addition to scanners and other equipment from Dominion Voting Systems Inc., Watchilla said. The contractor was recommended by county Manager C. David Pedri and approved by council.

Scheduling is underway for poll worker training sessions on the new system, set to begin in March, she said. Plans also will be announced soon for voter education opportunities, she said.

The voter registration deadline is now 15 days prior to an election, rather than 30 days, under the state reforms.

That means those interested in registering have until 4:30 p.m. April 13 to submit their applications to the office, Watchilla said.

Because voters will be have more time to register, counties will no longer use mail postmark dates as a factor for determining if applicants met the registration deadline.

Voter registration can be completed online through the county election section at www.luzernecounty.org or in the election office.

Watchilla urged voters with questions about the process to contact the election office at 570-825-1715 or email elections@luzernecounty.org.

PORT CLINTON — Reading & Northern Railroad announced that it has resolved its amusement tax dispute with Jim Thorpe and will resume passenger rail service to/from Jim Thorpe this Spring.

During discussions over the last three months the railroad advised borough officials about its efforts to support the development of tourism in Jim Thorpe and Carbon County.

Reading & Northern noted that it spent more than $50,000 a year on advertising and brochures promoting Jim Thorpe and Carbon County.

As a result of those efforts, and the investments made by the railroad in its passenger fleet and services, more than 200,000 people visited Jim Thorpe to see and ride the railroad. The result of these investments has benefited the merchants and citizens of Jim Thorpe and Carbon County.

“We are pleased to resume service to and from Jim Thorpe and put the amusement tax issue behind us,” said Andy Muller Jr., owner/CEO of Reading & Northern Railroad. “We have consistently stated that we are not now, and have never been, an amusement.”

State Sen. John Yudichak, I-Swoyersville, thanked Muller for restoring passenger train excursions in Jim Thorpe that attract thousands of visitors and millions of dollars to Carbon County each year.

“I appreciate the efforts of Jim Thorpe Borough officials and local business leaders who worked with Reading & Northern Railroad to ensure the trains will continue to run and tourism will continue to thrive in beautiful Jim Thorpe,” Yudichak said.

Muller said Reading & Northern is regulated strictly by the Federal Railroad Administration, which regulates the track, the engines, the rolling stock and the engineers and conductors.

“We take railroading very seriously,” Muller said. “While we are primarily a freight railroad, handling a record-breaking 34,000 carloads last year, we love to provide passenger trips to the communities we serve. It is our way of paying back to our region by sharing our love of railroading with old and young alike. We are delighted that the borough leadership has decided to work with us on continuing our tradition of bringing visitors to Jim Thorpe and offering train rides sharing the history of Jim Thorpe and the region to people from all over the country.”

Muller said Reading & Northern will announce its forthcoming passenger schedule in the near future. For more information visit — www.rbmnrr-passenger.com.

FORTY FORT — A man from Montgomery County was killed in a two vehicle crash on the North Cross Valley Expressway on Wednesday.

State police said Miller, operating a 2005 Chevrolet van, was stopped for unknown reasons in the right travel lane without the vehicle’s lights illuminated.

Miller’s vehicle was struck from behind by a 2005 Dodge Dakota, operated by Joseph Gruver, 24, of Dallas.

Miller was transported to Wilkes-Barre General Hospital where he died several hours later, state police said.

FORTY FORT — Ed Boyle hadn’t seen his childhood home in 84 years, but on Thursday, as he walked through the remodeled homestead of his youth, his memories were crystal clear.

Walking through the front door at 1220 Wyoming Ave. in Forty Fort, Boyle, 95, stopped and looked at a small room and he began to tell one of several stories he shared with several nieces, a nephew and his great-niece.

“This is where we put our Christmas tree,” Boyle said. “Right in front of these five windows. Everybody going by could see it.”

Pointing to the opposite wall of the room, Boyle said. “We called this the music room, And that’s where we had a piano. Two of my sisters played.”

You could see the memories coming back as Boyle walked from room to room, clearly recalling exactly what each contained and offering a story or two about each.

Boyle, the youngest of six children — four girls and two boys — born to Thomas J. and Elizabeth O’Malley Boyle, said he wanted to see the house before it was sold. The 3,400-square-foot, two-story house has been remodeled and is listed by Lewith & Freeman at $319,000.

Most of the house is still laid out the way it was when Boyle lived their from 1924 to 1935. His family then moved to 1441 Wyoming Ave. Boyle attended Dana Street Elementary School and he graduated from Forty Fort High School, Class of 1943.

Boyle went on to Wyoming Seminary Business School and the Wharton School of Business. He worked as a civilian for the Pennsylvania State Police, transferring to Harrisburg in 1970, where he has lived since.

Boyle looked around the living room and the dining room, noting that there once was a large chandelier that hung over the dining room table. When he talked about each room, you could envision what it must have been like and you could see and hear all those voices of children and adults.

Then Boyle noted a significant change. Where a new kitchen is, Boyle said there was a den. The kitchen of his day was to the left, he said with incontestable certainty, and a pantry was off to the side. As he gazed out what once were the kitchen’s back windows, he talked about a backyard with fruit trees of apples, peaches and pears, and a long gone two-car garage.

“It’s all changed now,” Boyle said, staring at a new outdoor deck and a paved parking lot where that orchard-like backyard used to be. “And we only had one bathroom for eight people.”

Heading upstairs, Boyle went right to the room he shared with his brother. He stood at the window that gave a close view of the Forty Fort Presbyterian Church.

“We had to be in bed at 9 p.m.,” he said. “But some nights we were kept awake by the organ music coming from the church next door.”

Boyle then told his nieces and nephew which rooms were shared by which sisters. Lots of pictures were taken and a video to preserve these moments and the history lesson offered by “Uncle Ed.”

Boyle then made his way to the third floor attic, a large space that has been “fixed up” with walls and flooring. In Boyle’s day, it was a place for him and his siblings to get away for a bit.

“We had an RCA Victrola right here,” he said. “We used to play classical records and operatic records.”

Someone asked if he played big band music too, and Boyle quickly responded,” This was before big bands were around,” bringing more perspective to the group.

Boyle told a secret to his family — that he sued to save money in the Victrola, which locked and he had the only key. He said it was a good plan until he lost the key.

“The neighbors had the same Victrola,”: he said. “So I asked if I could borrow their key and it worked and I got my money out of it.”

Boyle said the first movie to ever play at the Forty Fort movie theater was “Thoroughbreds Don’t Cry,” starring Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney.

Boyle smiled and said, “This has been an historic trip for me. It has done my soul good to come back.”

Tuzinski said a brick was placed just yesterday in the Forty Fort Borough Park in memory of the Boyle family.

DALLAS — Patrick Musto, a Dallas resident and school board member, announced he is seeking the Republican nomination for the 117th Legislative District seat, currently held by fellow Republican, Rep. Karen Boback.

“I’ve seen first-hand the pain that property taxes have inflicted on the residents of Luzerne County,” Musto said in an emailed news release. “These increases, combined with the ever-increasing school taxes, have forced seniors out of their homes. I believe the state lawmakers have been remiss in their duty to the taxpayer. Nothing has changed in the landscape of this district for the last 13 years. Taxpayers are tired of lip-service from complacent legislators.”

Musto said he is a proponent of HB/SB-76, which calls for the elimination of property taxes in favor of higher state income tax and state sales tax.

“Today, Pennsylvanians are faced with a disintegrating tax base,” Musto said. “However, we are still tasked with maintaining and improving the quality of education, and we need to fund that in a more equitable manner.”

According to the news release, Musto chaired the negotiating committee during “the long and contentious strike at the Dallas School District.” He said he was instrumental in hammering out an agreement with the teachers union that included a first-ever healthcare contribution.

Musto said he also spearheaded the financing and construction of the new Dallas Intermediate School. The project was completed on time and under budget, with no change orders, he said. Over four years at Dallas, Musto said the rate of annual tax increases decreased, culminating on a 0% tax increase for 2019-2020. Musto was the finance chair during this period.

Musto, who dubs himself a Constitutionalist, is a King’s College graduate, where he received a bachelor of arts in education. He is the co-owner of Tuf-Tex Flooring in Plains Township. He has been married for 31 years to his wife, Valerie Hayden Musto. He has two daughters; Olivia and Gianna, both graduates of the Dallas School District.

“I know it will take time, energy, and money to defeat the incumbent,” Musto said. “I’ll be asking Republican voters if they are satisfied with the progress the legislature has made on the issues that face the Commonwealth. I see it this way. If they are happy with an annual billion dollar state budget shortfall and a $60 billion pension crisis that repeatedly gets unaddressed because we have a state legislature that is peppered with retired educators who pander to the education voting bloc, then they can go ahead and vote for my opponent.

“Frankly, I can’t imagine a true conservative Republican being satisfied with this kind of inaction in the face of these daunting and potentially catastrophic issues”.

WILKES-BARRE — For nearly one hour, Brandon Joseph Gambardella listened to family and friends of Anthony Bonney and how the fatal shooting of the teen has affected their lives.

Gambardella, 20, of West Hazleton, mostly kept his head down and leaned in his chair as 11 people, including Bonney’s mother, Faith Saccaetti, testified during his sentencing hearing before Luzerne County Judge Fred A. Pierantoni III on Thursday.

Prosecutors alleged Gambardella set up to meet Bonney, 17, at a park in Freeland to buy cocaine on June 18, 2018.

Gambardella gave $110 to Bonney who in exchange passed off drywall shavings and baking soda, prosecutors said.

When Gambardella realized the substance was fake, he chased after Bonney and fired several rounds from a handgun, striking Bonney in the head.

Gambardella pleaded guilty to third-degree murder as prosecutors withdrew an open count of criminal homicide.

Bonney’s mother testified she will never forget the last moments when she saw her son, who woke her up to say he was going to a friend’s house.

A little while later, Saccaetti said she was awakened with news that a boy had been shot at the Freeland park. After making several phone calls and unable to reach her son, she ran to the park and remembering a police officer looking at the ground when she said her son’s name.

“How could someone take away my favorite person in the world,” Saccaetti said. “He was handsome, loving and kind. He was not only my son, he was my best friend.”

Family and friends also testified about Bonney, saying how he taught his little sister how to ride a bicycle and pushed her on swings, his love of playing football and how he played the video game Mario Kart every day.

Gambardella’s attorney, Mark Bufalino, read a letter from his client’s adoptive mother, Kimberly McGrain, saying how Gambardella as an infant was left abandoned by his natural born parents in an apartment. Gambardella was also found to have several drugs in his system at birth, McGrain stated in her letter.

“He did not deserve what I did to him,” Gambardella said when he addressed Pierantoni. “I’m going to live with this for the rest of my life. I made a stupid choice to pull the trigger on a 17-year-old kid. I’m terribly sorry. There is nothing I can say.”

Pierantoni accepted the agreed-upon sentence reached with Deputy Assistant District Attorney Chester F. Dudick and Assistant District Attorney Drew McLaughlin, sending Gambardella to state prison for 15 to 40 years.

In a related case, Felicia Marie Catrone, 20, of Cleveland Street, Hazleton, recently pleaded guilty to perjury and tampering with evidence connected to hiding the .25-caliber handgun Gambardella used in the fatal shooting.

Catrone drove the getaway vehicle after the fatal shooting and gave false testimony during a court proceeding related to Gambardella.

HANOVER TWP. — A man wanted on allegations he attacked an ex-girlfriend when he kicked in a door at her Wilkes-Barre residence in 2016 was captured by township police.

Township police said they arrested Geraldo Martinez, 30, of Bronx, N.Y., while investigating a suspicious person in the 200 block of Marion Terrace Apartments just after 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

A records check showed Martinez was wanted by Wilkes-Barre police and by the Luzerne County Sheriff’s Department.

City police obtained an arrest warrant for Martinez from District Judge Rick Cronauer in Wilkes-Barre on July 28, 2016, charging him with burglary, simple assault and terroristic threats.

Charging documents say Martinez kicked in a door to a residence in the 200 block of Lehigh Street on July 22, 2016, and held a knife to his ex-girlfriend’s throat threatening to take her life.

Martinez was arraigned Wednesday by District Judge Joseph D. Spagnuolo Jr. and jailed without bail as he was deemed a flight risk and a danger to the community.

WILKES-BARRE — A father who admitted to violently shaking his then 3-month old boy causing severe injuries in 2011 has been charged with criminal homicide after the child died last year.

PLAINS TWP. — The fact that it was Valentine’s Day did not escape Ron Beer during his opening remarks in announcing an $80 million expansion of the Frank M. and Dorothea Henry Cancer Center at Geisinger Wyoming Valley.

HUNLOCK TWP. — A Plains Township man died as a result of being struck by a vehicle on state Route 11 Thursday night.

WILKES-BARRE — City police said Motorworld Auto Group filed a report that four Jeep Wranglers were stolen from their lot.

PLAINS TWP. — A taste of Philadelphia has set up shop in the Mohegan Sun Pocono casino, and it replaced a ribbon-cutting with a cutting of a giant cheesesteak.

WILKES-BARRE — City Council on Thursday night approved Mayor George Brown’s $51.9 million balanced budget for this year.

Applications are now available for Luzerne County voters interested in casting their April 28 primary election ballots by mail.

PORT CLINTON — Reading & Northern Railroad announced that it has resolved its amusement tax dispute with Jim Thorpe and will resume passenger rail service to/from Jim Thorpe this Spring.

FORTY FORT — A man from Montgomery County was killed in a two vehicle crash on the North Cross Valley Expressway on Wednesday.

FORTY FORT — Ed Boyle hadn’t seen his childhood home in 84 years, but on Thursday, as he walked through the remodeled homestead of his youth, his memories were crystal clear.

DALLAS — Patrick Musto, a Dallas resident and school board member, announced he is seeking the Republican nomination for the 117th Legislative District seat, currently held by fellow Republican, Rep. Karen Boback.

WILKES-BARRE — For nearly one hour, Brandon Joseph Gambardella listened to family and friends of Anthony Bonney and how the fatal shooting of the teen has affected their lives.

I’m a believer in educating yourself about genealogy. The more you learn from the experts, the more progress you will make and the more accurate will be your results.

This is an open letter to all of our incumbent legislators on both sides of the aisle, including independents.

If you listen, you can clearly hear groaning and moaning coming from the graves of the former members of the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention.

This newspaper has frequently and vocally sung the praises of Court Appointed Special Advocates of Luzerne County.

Bad enough that a tyrant is testing American democracy. Now an oligarch is trying to buy the presidency.

The death of a young Chinese doctor who was silenced by authorities when he tried to warn about the outbreak of the coronavirus has lit up the country’s social media with outrage.

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Just about any time in the past half-year that any voter in Iowa or anywhere looked for the latest Joe Biden campaign news as it poured out of the Great News Funnel and onto their news screens or news pages, what they most often saw or heard following Biden’s name was “and his son, Hunter.” And then, “Burisma.”

The Senate’s acquittal of President Donald Trump closes a troubling chapter in our nation’s history and concludes with an acquittal because the process lacked any semblance of due process or evidence and lacked any semblance of a desire to get to the truth.

Last Sunday’s front page story about Quinn Crispell by staff writer Mary Therese Biebel was more than a feel-good saga of a child with Down syndrome overcoming the many obstacles the condition can throw into a child’s path. It also shows the importance of providing all the help we can to anyone dealing with special needs.

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