Watch the Teaser Trailer for Andy Muschietti’s It Chapter Two, Starring Jessica Chastain and Bill Hader The film’s relatively static approach to narrative works in scenes where the material is funny or elevated by a certain performance. Amy Poehler’s feature directorial debut, Wine Country, has goodwill to burn. The film, about a reunion weekend shared by six longtime friends, actually stages a reunion of beloved female performers from one of SNL’s strongest periods: Poehler, Maya Rudolph, Rachel Dratch, Ana Gasteyer, Paula Pell, and Tina Fey. Written by Liz Cackowsky and Emily Spivey, Wine Country appears to presume—and probably correctly—that no elaborate plot is necessary to motivate the collective hijinks of its legendary cast. But it tries to skirt by on too little, as its barebones story and reliance on stoking nostalgia fail to deliver the emotional payoff it ultimately wants—or to provide much beyond moments of fleeting humor. Poehler plays Abby, a character who is, in her neurotic perfectionism and attachment to binders and schedules, perhaps a shade too reminiscent of Poehler’s Leslie Knope from Parks and Recreation. The film opens with Abby convincing five longtime fr...