As part of the German government-funded project EffiLas, Laserline is developing the first high-power blue diode laser sources based on laser bars. In cooperation with laser bar manufacturer Osram, the established power scaling technology for the near-infrared (near-IR) wavelength is applied for the first time for the blue wavelength. This article reviews the motivation, the technology, and the first applications with a high-power blue diode laser having up to 700 W power. Over the last few decades, continuous-wave (CW) powered laser applications have become established as a versatile tool in modern manufacturing operations, covering welding, cladding, surface treatment, hardening, brazing, cutting, and more. The shift from a scientific technology to a common production tool has been pushed by the ongoing research of new laser sources, which have continuously enabled new applications. The first developments in high-power CW laser technology occurred before the millennium—the establishment of carbon-dioxide (CO2) lasers at 10.6 µm and diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers at 1064 nm. CO2 lasers, however, could not be fiber-delivered and Nd:YAG systems were limited in brightness and power-sc...